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Fire Supression Systems - Articles and news items

New UNECE regulation for fire suppression systems in bus & coach engine compartments issued

Industry news  •  26 September 2016  •  Katie Sadler, Digital Content Producer, Eurotransport

In July this year, a new amendment of UNECE Regulation 107 was published in relation to fire suppression systems in engine compartments of buses and coaches.

Bus fire: Best-practices to reduce risk

Issue 5 2014  •  24 October 2014  •  Fredrik Rosén and Joey Peoples from the SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden

Bus transportation is regarded as one of the safest modes of public transportation. Millions of passengers ride safely every day to and from work, school and for pleasure. The manufacturers and operators of buses have gone to great lengths to establish and maintain this safety record. However, a bus fire resulting from a collision or failure of a component puts lives at risk and can have an enormous impact on operational costs as well as customer confidence. Fredrik Rosén and Joey Peoples from the SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden explore this area further with details of fire testing methods, increasing the awareness of fire safety, and how the Research Institute will continue to expand the envelope of knowledge in support of us and coach fire safety through research, testing and certification…

The importance of automatic fire suppression systems

Issue 6 2012  •  22 January 2013  •  Jonas Brandt, Project Manager, SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden

This is the second and final part of an article to provide a background look at bus fires and to underline the importance of automatic fire suppression systems for buses and coaches. Bus and coach1 fires are a common issue in society. Given the fact that most fires start in the engine compartment, adequate active fire protection systems for engine compartments are advantageous both in terms of passenger safety, carrier and insurance company economy, and general public resource management. However, there is still no legislative demand for this course of action, nor an international standard for testing bus engine compartment fire suppression systems. For this reason, SP has recently developed a new standard named SP Method 4912.

SP Method 4912 describes a new method to test and validate the fire suppression performance of different suppression systems in a repeatable and reproducible way. A broad reference group including more than 80 companies such as bus manufacturers and operators, transport auth – orities, insurance companies, fire investigators and suppression system manufacturers have given valuable feedback to the development of the method. More than 450 pre-tests have been performed involving 10 fire suppression system manufacturers and with several different types of suppression agents, such as ABC- and BC-dry chemical, water mist, water spray and foam systems, aerosol and clean agent.

The importance of automatic fire suppression systems

Issue 5 2012  •  31 October 2012  •  Jonas Brandt, Project Manager, SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden

This is the first of two articles to provide a background look at bus fires and to underline the importance of automatic fire suppression systems for buses and coaches. About 1% of all buses suffer some form of fire incident each year. Most of these fires occur in the vehicle’s engine compartment located at the rear of the bus or coach, making it difficult for the driver to discover the fire. Experience from Sweden – where the installation of detection and fire suppression systems is actively encouraged by the insurance industry – shows that the installation of an automatic fire suppression system is an important fire safety measure. The second part of this article will be published in Eurotransport Issue 6 2012.

High number of bus fires: Bus fires are an increasing worldwide problem. Even though accidents that cause injuries are fortunately quite uncommon, the potential risk of a disastrous event is still high, with several examples in recent years highlighting this. In the evening of 8 September 2009, the Atac bus depot in Rome, Italy, was enveloped in flames with 24 gas-fuelled buses destroyed. Only five months earlier, another Atac depot had burnt down, destroying 30 mini-buses. On 4 November 2008, on the motorway near Garbsen in Germany, a coach carrying a group of pensioners and children caught fire.

 

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